The 3 Secrets Of Wow Customer Service

 


Your aim in giving your visitors exceptional service is to make them say "Wow!" as soon as you disappear. You can do that if you make the following three tips apart of your regular pattern of service.

1. Give The Visitors Plenty of Strokes. People love to be stroked. Strokes can include any greeting, the use of people's names, and good wishes of the "Have-a-nice-day" kind. But the best stroke you can give others is your undivided attention.

2. Attend To The Little Things. Paying attention to the little things which don't significantly affect the main service is a way of saying: "If we look after the little things, just think what we'll do with the big ones."

3. Always Say "Yes." Excellent customer service never turns down a request for help. Even if they can do it themselves, they'll know that you are someone who can help them.

Practice these three responses until they are as familiar to you as breathing, and you are guaranteed to have customers queueing up for your attention.

Musical Phones (Video)

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"Let me transfer your call."


What goes through your mind when you hear those words? Do you have visions of being placed on hold, waiting for someone else to come on the line, repeating what you just said, and then hearing one more time, "Let me transfer your call?"


Feelings of frustration set in and your confidence in the company you dialed begins to diminish. It's a game of musical phones played to a tune that no one enjoys.


If you don't like being transferred from person to person over the phone, the visitors don't care for it either. There are several ways to transfer callers without creating more problems along the way.


  • Listen to the caller's issue. Even if you think you know immediately what people want and who can help them, hear them out. Don't interrupt. You could learn something that will change your mind about how to handle the call.
  • Avoid saying the word "transfer." Tell people that you need to "send" their call to another department or employee. Offer to "connect" them or "put them through" to someone else. Using a different term can save your callers undue anxiety and fellow employees from dealing with edgy customers.
  • Check to be sure that the person to whom you are sending the call is available. Your customer will not be happy if the call unexpectedly goes through to a voice mailbox. If you know that the person who can help is not in, ask before transferring callers to voice mail. They may prefer another route.
  • Verify that you have the right person before connecting the call. If you aren't certain, ask the caller to wait while you check.
  • Give your caller the name and the direct number of the person you are directing the call. That way, if there is a disconnect, your customer knows whom to ask for when they call back. If you can stay on the line and make an introduction, that is all the better. This is called a “warm transfer.”
  • If you want to provide customer service that will delight your callers, offer your name and number and invite people to call you back if their needs are not met or their questions are not answered. Thoughtfully and carefully transferring calls reflects positively on your entire organization and will eliminate musical phones.


Texas Hospital Workers Scramble as Winter Storm Hampered Operations (Video)


I wanted to share this article with you that I came across. I'm keeping my eyes on what's going on in Texas and in their hospital systems. 


“An emergency on top of a pandemic”: Texas hospital workers scramble as winter storm hampered operations


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Icy roads kept a pregnant Texas woman from reaching the nearest birthing center early Monday, so, the medical director of the tiny Bayside Community Hospital in rural East Texas delivered her baby in the emergency room.


Hours later, the water shut down.


For the next three days, staffers at three Chambers Health facilities in Anahuac, outside Houston, pumped water from wellness pools, refilled a 275-gallon storage tank three times and carted drums of water between facilities so toilets could be flushed.


Burst pipes and frozen pumps throughout the community were reportedly the issue, said William Kiefer, CEO of Chambers Health.


“If we didn’t have our resources and our people being really clever on how to go about pulling water out of our pool and refilling that [storage tank], we would have been without,” he said. “The city and the county were struggling with their own things. …. As far as help, I don’t think there was really anything they could have done.”


Hospitals across Texas struggled through water outages and food supply disruption in the wake of this week’s historic and debilitating winter storm.


Patient logjams, overflowing emergency rooms and hospital beds, exhausted workers, staffing shortages and power outages added to the challenging conditions, hospital officials said.


“To see this type of crisis on top of what we’ve dealt with, with the pandemic, and to see how our staff have responded, is one of the most awe-inspiring things that I’ve worked with over the course of my career,” said Doug Lawson, CEO of CHI St. Luke’s Health in Houston.


The Crosbyton Clinic Hospital east of Lubbock took in residents from a nearby nursing home after that facility's roof partially collapsed, according to the Texas Organization of Rural and Community Hospitals, which was monitoring rural hospitals during the week.


In Brady, east of San Angelo, the icy conditions delayed the delivery of clinical supplies and food to the Heart of Texas Healthcare System Hospital, causing hospital staff to turn to local retailers.


At Olney Hamilton Hospital in North Texas, staff spent the night at the hospital to avoid being stranded at home unable to get to work.


“The rural hospitals across Texas have faced similar challenges to urban hospitals with power outages, water stoppages, reduced or no food deliveries, but they are making it work,” said TORCH spokesperson Don McBeath. “Rural areas know they are often on their own, at least for a while, and this is no different.”


At Houston Methodist Hospital, officials faced potential problems when patients were being discharged but had nowhere to go. Officials set up areas for patients to wait comfortably until they were transported home or to hotels if the power and water was out at their homes, said Roberta Schwartz, executive vice president at the hospital.


“It is very hard to have people discharged when you’re sending them home to a house without power,” she said. “You can imagine people’s reluctance to leave where they are.”


Those who had livable conditions to return to were not always able to leave in the snow and ice. That made discharging patients “one of our biggest challenges” during the storm, David Huffstutler, president and CEO of St. David’s HealthCare in the Austin area, said in a Thursday emailed statement.


The lack of services such as outpatient clinics, pharmacies, physicians’ offices, urgent care and dialysis centers also increased the pressure on hospitals, Schwartz said.


“They were closed due to lack of water or power, so everyone who needed services from those places came to the hospital,” she said. “So our emergency room saw record numbers. It was astounding.”


Hospitals canceled elective surgeries, waited days on delayed medication shipments and are having to seek oxygen tanks from outside sources to meet a critical oxygen supply issue, said Carrie Williams, spokesperson for the Texas Hospital Association.


While some issues like deliveries, water pressure and power problems are starting to ease up for some, most in the affected areas are still experiencing challenges, she said.


“For Texas hospitals, this is an emergency on top of a pandemic,” Williams said. “They have been on the front lines now with broken pipes, dwindling supplies and water restrictions. There is unimaginable pressure on everyone, patients and staff and families. They see and feel the desperation, and hospitals are doing whatever they can to be there for people.”


Water woes

Prolonged freezing temperatures led to several problems with water pressure and water supply for millions of Texas homes, businesses and hospitals. That can severely impact hospitals’ ability to perform basic functions, even beyond flushing the toilets.

Several facilities across the state had seen water issues starting on Monday as local systems froze or electricity problems knocked them offline. But the pressures intensified as residents’ pipes burst, pumping stations froze, boil notices went out and local officials warned residents to stop dripping their faucets to conserve water.


“Water is key to our ability to power the hospitals,” said Lawson, the St. Luke’s CEO in Houston. “It is key to our ability to keep air flowing through our systems and to cool many of our medical devices. So when water is lost or we’re not able to access a steady supply of water, services in the hospital can be impacted.”


Hospitals in both urban and rural areas reported having tankers bring water in to bring up supply and energize water pressure.


At St. David’s South Austin Medical Center, officials transferred 30 patients on Wednesday to other facilities “out of caution” after citywide water issues caused three facilities in the area to lose water pressure, Huffstutler said.


At the South Austin facility, the facility’s heating system, like many hospitals, uses boilers and experienced problems when the pressure dropped, Huffstutler said.


“We were able to get a water truck in to alleviate the issues on the heating system,” he said. “With the water truck and the recirculation of water in the chillers, we were able to create a closed-loop system in the hospital to keep it warm.”


Similar issues were reported at some Arlington and Dallas hospitals as well.


At Houston Methodist West in Houston, staffers collected rainwater in big gray laundry carts on Tuesday and used it to fill buckets for toilet flushing when the water pressure dropped, Schwartz said.


The Dimmit Regional Hospital, a 48-bed facility in Carrizo Springs in South Texas, had no running water in the hospital and was using bottled water for drinking, McBeath said.


In South Texas, water problems temporarily shut down laboratory operations at the Uvalde Memorial Hospital after electricity problems in the city shut down the local water pumps. The pool water was being used to flush toilets at the Refugio County Memorial Hospital, McBeath said.


At CHI St. Luke's Health - The Vintage Hospital in Houston, officials were just hours from shutting down the hospital altogether on Wednesday afternoon until water tankers arrived, Lawson said.


“I’ve only had about three points in my career that we’ve had to actually access tankers of water to ensure that a hospital’s systems remained operational,” Lawson said. “That was one of those days.”


Disclosure: Texas Hospital Association has been a financial supporter of The Texas Tribune, a nonprofit, nonpartisan news organization that is funded in part by donations from members, foundations and corporate sponsors. Financial supporters play no role in the Tribune's journalism. Find a complete list of them here.


This article originally appeared in The Texas Tribune at https://www.texastribune.org/2021/02/18/texas-hospitals-power-outages-winter-storm/.


The Texas Tribune is a member-supported, nonpartisan newsroom informing and engaging Texans on state politics and policy. Learn more at texastribune.org.

Unit Sectaries and Their Health (Video)

    Check out this story about one of our fellow Unit Secretaries who was saved by quick-thinking nurses in the ICU that she works in. 

    This reminds me of secretaries that I worked with who suffered health setbacks. One had a stroke, the other had multiple heart attacks. Two others both died of cancer.

    I suffer a health setback, and I almost died.  

    Life is precious.    



To order a copy of Healing Is Mine. End of Discussion, click the link.

Hospital in Texas Facing Water and Heating Woes as the Winter Storm Rages (Video)

 


Whenever a hurricane was approaching Florida, I would volunteer to work during the hurricane because the hospital is the "safest place to be." When you really stop and think about it, a hospital is basically its own city. 


But when the state that you live in is catching hell and then the hospital starts to catch hell, well then...


My heart goes out to everyone suffering and I want to thank all of the Unit Secretaries all of the county who are doing their part to help in a time like this. 

6 Tips For Keeping Your Cool When Things Get Hot (Video)

 



1. Be assertive – not aggressive or passive. My definition of assertion is simple: "Say what you mean, mean what you say, and don't be mean when you say it." Let this rule guide your conversations with all visitors, and you will always be confident, cool, and in control, and you'll always be professional.

2. Speak more slowly. You'll be amazed at how much more clearly you can think and how much control and confidence you’ll experience when you consciously slow down your rate of speech. Speak slowly and methodically when your emotional triggers are launched, and you'll maintain poise during a difficult conversation.

3. Wait 1-2 seconds before responding. Responding immediately to demanding or tactical visitors could result in you saying something you'll later regret. Before you answer, take a deep breath, wait at least 2 seconds, and think about the best response and the best approach.

4. Take a time-out. When you sense that your buttons have been pushed, take a break. You can tell the visitor that you need to put him on hold while you go get the nurse or whatever excuse sounds good at the time. The point is to get away from the situation for a few seconds so you can re-group.

5. Use positive self-talk. I'm going to sound like Dr. Phil on this one, but I'm quite serious. Instead of saying to yourself, "I don't get paid enough to put up with this shit." Say something more positive like, "This guy needs my help." Thinking more positively helps you respond more positively and professionally. Negative thoughts lead to negative words, and it spirals into an extremely hostile situation.

6. Show your power before you use it. Often, a subtle suggestion of your "power" is far more effective than the outright use of your power. But, believe it or not, you are far more "powerful" if you say, "I want to help you, but when you yell and cut me off, you make it difficult for me to work with you." This statement demonstrates your power, and your message most definitely gets across.


These straightforward tips will position you to keep your cool when situations get hot!



Will Hospital Patient Visits Return to Normal in 2021?


This article asks a good question. Will the patient census return to normal in 2021. Those working in a hospital know that the usual suspects are also known as "frequent fliers" will never let a pandemic stop them from visiting the hospital. But what about everyone else?

Tell me what you think will happen this year? Click the link below and tell me what you think. Leave your comments below.


https://revcycleintelligence.com/news/will-hospital-patient-visits-return-to-normal-in-2021